First Nations and Province sign marine plan implementation agreements

Posted on August 3, 2016 by adminMaPP

First Nations and Province sign marine plan implementation agreements

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
2016FLNR0156-001388
Aug. 3, 2016
Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance,
Coastal First Nations-Great Bear Initiative
Council of the Haida Nation
Nanwakolas Council
North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society

First Nations and Province sign marine plan implementation agreements
VICTORIA – Today, the Province and 17 coastal First Nations signed implementation agreements for four Marine Planning Partnership (MaPP) marine plans, collaboratively developed for the North Pacific Coast.

Completed in 2015, the plans foster a balance between stewardship and economic development using an ecosystem-based management approach that includes recommendations for marine management, uses and activities. Plans have been completed for four sub-regions: the Central Coast, Haida Gwaii, North Coast, and North Vancouver Island. In addition to the sub-regional marine plans, the Regional Action Framework, released this spring, outlines actions related to marine management that the Province and First Nations agree will be most effectively implemented on a regional scale. These actions are consistent with and support implementation of the sub-regional marine plans.

Taken together, these plans will inform First Nation and provincial decision-making in the respective sub-regional coastal and marine areas. The marine plans do not address management of uses and activities that the Province considers to be federal government jurisdiction. First Nations and the Province commit to working with the federal government on those issues.

In signing the implementation agreements, the partners agree to co-lead implementation of the marine plans, including ongoing engagement with communities, local governments, and stakeholders. The agreements describe how the Province and First Nations will work together and how implementation activities will be prioritized and managed. Example priorities include continuing collaborative governance arrangements; implementation of marine zoning; fostering marine stewardship, monitoring and compliance; and facilitating sustainable economic development opportunities to support healthy communities.

Implementation of the four marine plans will complement related plans and planning activities, such as the Pacific North Coast Integrated Marine Area Initiative, and the development of a Marine Protected Area Network for the Northern Shelf Bioregion, in addition to other MaPP partner initiatives within the sub-regions.

Quotes:
Steve Thomson, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations –

“I’m pleased that we are able to formally begin implementation of these important marine plans. These plans chart a long-term vision for our northern maritime areas and provide a useful set of recommendations to help facilitate the review, assessment and referral processes for marine use applications.”

John Rustad, Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation –

“The implementation of these plans signals an important step forward in our efforts to improve relationships with First Nations on governance and management issues.”

kil tlaats ‘gaa, Peter Lantin, President of the Haida Nation –

“The Haida Gwaii Marine Plan is an important addition to the work the Haida Nation has completed on the land, working collaboratively with the Province for the well-being of Haida Gwaii. We look forward to working on the implementation of shared priorities that will sustain healthy oceans and an abundance of marine life for generations to come.”

Don Roberts, Chief Kitsumkalum Nation, chair of the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society –

“Implementation of the recommendations in the MaPP North Coast Marine Plan is a priority to the member and partner Nations of the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society. Signing this agreement means we will have a stronger working relationship with the Province of B.C. This will result in the protection of our resources and a healthy marine ecosystem.”

Doug Neasloss, governance representative, Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance –

“The Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv Nations take responsibility for all the resources in our territories. While there is still much work to do to ensure our indigenous laws are reflected in all marine management decisions, working with the Province to implement the Central Coast Marine Plan represents an important step in our continued effort to ensure responsible stewardship and management in these areas. ”

Dallas Smith, President, Nanwakolas Council –

“The Nanwakolas Council is pleased to confirm an official implementation agreement with the Province that commits to our continued co-leadership in implementing the North Vancouver Island Marine Plan in our member First Nation territories. We jointly developed this marine plan with B.C. and signed it last year, on the condition of a formal implementation agreement. We now look forward to accelerating projects that will increase our governance and influence over marine uses and activities in our territories, as well as projects to achieve our goals for improved community economic health and ecosystem health.”

Kelly Russ, chair, Coastal First Nations – Great Bear Initiative –

“The implementation of marine plans ensures strategic, forward-looking planning for regulating, managing and protecting the marine environment. These plans include addressing the multiple, cumulative, and potentially conflicting uses of the ocean. The Coastal First Nations believe the marine plans are an important tool to balance existing and new ocean uses with protection, conservation and restoration of ecologically important ocean and coastal habitats.”

Learn More:
•Full copies of the four plans and plan overviews are available at http://www.mappocean.org and at https://www.for.gov.bc.ca/tasb/SLRP(scroll to Marine Planning Partnership for the North Pacific Coast)

• The Central Coast Marine Plan and overview is also available at: http://ccira.ca/

• The Haida Gwaii Marine Plan and overview is also available at: http://www.haidanation.ca/

• The North Coast Marine Plan and overview is also available at: http://www.northcoastskeenafirstnations.ca/

• The North Vancouver Island Marine Plan and overview is also available at: http://www.nanwakolas.com/

A backgrounder follows.

Media Contact:

Media Relations
Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
250 356-5261

Russ Jones
Manager, Marine Planning
Council of the Haida Nation
250 559-4468

Ken Cripps
Program Director
Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance
250 739-0740

Robert Grodecki
Executive Director
North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society
250 624-8614

John Bones
Marine Planning Coordinator
Nanwakolas Council
250 652-4002

Kelly Russ
Chair
Coastal First Nations – Great Bear Initiative
604 828-4621

Connect with the Province of B.C. at: www.gov.bc.ca/connect

BACKGROUNDER
Marine planning partnership regions
Central Coast Sub-Region

The Central Coast plan area extends from Laredo Channel and the northern tip of Aristazabal Island in the north to the southern limit of Rivers Inlet and Calvert Island. Moving from the west, the area includes the shelf waters of Queen Charlotte Sound, hundreds of islands, and exposed rocky headlands which meet an intricate shoreline in the eastern portion of the plan area. The shoreline is cut by narrow channels and steep-walled fjords that contain ecologically complex estuaries, calm inlets and pocket coves. Its main communities include Bella Coola, Bella Bella, Ocean Falls, Wuikinuxv, Shearwater and Klemtu. First Nations partners participating in the Central Coast Marine Plan include the Heiltsuk, Kitasoo/Xai’Xais, Nuxalk and Wuikinuxv Nations.

Haida Gwaii Sub-Region
Xaadaa Gwaay, Xaaydag̱a Gwaay.yaay, or Haida Gwaii (“Islands of the people”) is an archipelago on the edge of the continental shelf off the north coast of British Columbia. It is surrounded by several large bodies of water – Hecate Strait separates Haida Gwaii from the mainland, and the islands are bounded by Dixon Entrance in the north, Queen Charlotte Sound to the south and the Pacific Ocean to the west. The chain of islands extends roughly 250 kilometres from its southern tip to its northernmost point and includes the communities of G̱aaw (Old Massett), Masset, Gamadiis Llnagaay (Port Clements), Tll.aal Llnagaay (Tlell), Hlg̱aagilda (Skidegate), Daajing Giids (Queen Charlotte) and K’il Llnagaay (Sandspit). Boundaries for the Haida Gwaii plan area are defined by the Haida Statement of Claim (east/south), the international boundary with the United States (north), and the toe of the continental slope (west). Gwaii Haanas is included in the Haida Gwaii sub-region but spatial zoning for this area is being addressed through a separate planning process.

North Coast Sub-Region

The North Coast plan area includes an impressive stretch of coastline that is indented with deep fjords and dotted with thousands of islands. It is a region of profound beauty, significant ecological diversity and remarkable cultural richness. The North Coast plan area extends from Portland Inlet to the south end of Aristazabal Island, where it has an overlap with the northern boundary of the Central Coast plan area. The western edge of the North Coast plan area borders the Haida Gwaii plan area. Prince Rupert, Terrace and Kitimat are the largest communities in the North Coast plan area, and support an overall population of approximately 42,000 people. Participating First Nations in the North plan area include the Gitga’at, Gitxaala, Kitsumkalum, Kitselas, Haisla, and Metlakatla Nations, who are represented by the North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society, in this planning process.

North Vancouver Island Sub-Region
The North Vancouver Island plan area is home to the Kwakw’ka’wakw First Nations and lies between northern Vancouver Island and B.C.’s mainland. There are many islands, inlets and fjords within the area, which is characterized by its natural beauty and biodiversity of species and ecosystems. Major water bodies include Queen Charlotte Sound, Queen Charlotte Strait, Johnstone Strait, Smith Inlet, Seymour Inlet, Knight Inlet and Bute Inlet. The plan area includes the communities of Port Hardy, Port McNeill, Alert Bay, Sayward and Campbell River. Members of the Nanwakolas Council and partners in the MaPP initiative are: Mamalilikulla-Qwe’Qwa’Sot’Em, Tlowitsis, Da’nakda’xw-Awaetlatla, Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw, Wei Wai Kum, Kwiakah and the K’ómoks First Nations.

Media Contact:

Media Relations
Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
250 356-5261

Russ Jones
Manager, Marine Planning
Council of the Haida Nation
250 559-4468

Ken Cripps
Program Director
Central Coast Indigenous Resource Alliance
250 739-0740

Robert Grodecki
Executive Director
North Coast-Skeena First Nations Stewardship Society
250 624-8614

John Bones
Marine Planning Coordinator
Nanwakolas Council
250 652-4002

Kelly Russ
Chair
Coastal First Nations – Great Bear Initiative
604 828-4621

Connect with the Province of B.C. at: www.gov.bc.ca/connect

SGang Gwaay

The village of Ninstints (Nans Dins) is located on a small island off the west coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands (Haida Gwaii). Remains of houses, together with carved mortuary and memorial poles, illustrate the Haida people’s art and way of life. The site commemorates the living culture of the Haida people and their relationship to the land and sea, and offers a visual key to their oral traditions.

sgang-gwaay-copyright-amanda
SGang Gwaay – Amanda

Outstanding Universal Value

Brief Synthesis

On the island of SG̱ang Gwaay, the remains of large cedar long houses, together with a number of carved mortuary and memorial poles at the village of SG̱ang Gwaay Llnagaay (formerly Nan Sdins), illustrate the art and way of life of the Haida. The property commemorates the living culture of the Haidaand their relationship with the land and sea. It also offers a visual key to their oral traditions. The village of SG̱ang Gwaay was occupied until shortly after 1880. What survives is unique in the world, a 19th-century Haida village where the ruins of houses and memorial or mortuary poles illustrate the power and artistry of Haida society.

Criterion (iii): SG̱ang Gwaay bears unique testimony to the culture of the Haida. The art represented by the carved poles at SG̱ang Gwaay Llnagaay (Nan Sdins) is recognized to be among the finest examples of its type in the world.

Integrity

The property is wholly contained within the natural boundaries of the island on which all remains are located, thus ensuring the complete representation of the features and processes that convey the property’s significance. There is some degradation of the ruins and mortuary poles due to natural processes, but the property is protected from adverse effects of human development and invasive species. There has been no permanent settlement on the property since the early 19th century.

While no formal buffer zone is associated with this property, it is within the 147,000 ha Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site (created in 1993) and the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site (created in 2010).

Authenticity

SG̱ang Gwaay is unquestionably authentic in terms of its location and setting, forms and designs, materials and substances as well as spirit and feeling. The property is an authentic illustration of the evolving Haida culture, as can be seen in the relationships between the forms and designs of the art and structures at the property, and contemporary Haida art. The property continues to hold significant spiritual value for the Haida and is still used today.

After consultation with chiefs and elders, in 1995 four poles were straightened and stabilized and in 1997 an additional pole was stabilized in an effort to prolong the period before they return naturally to the earth. Identified and potential threats to the authenticity of the property include the general decomposition of the cedar poles and house remains, the impact of deer on the in-situ artefacts (the situation is reviewed on a regular basis and culling happens as required), and unsupervised visitors who may inadvertently damage the fragile cultural resources by touching or walking on them.

Protection and management requirements

SG̱ang Gwaay is commemorated by the Government of Canada as a National Historic Site (1981) and is protected under the Constitution of the Haida Nation (2003), the Canada National Parks Act (2000), and related management systems. Situated within the boundaries of the Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, the property is cooperatively managed by the Government of Canada and the Council of the Haida Nation. Cultural resource management requirements for the property are currently addressed under the management plan for the entire Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site (2008).

An Archipelago Management Board (AMB), comprised of Haida and Government of Canada representatives, determines all operational, planning and management actions, using a consensus-based decision-making model. The AMB examines all initiatives and undertakings related to the planning, operation, and management of SG̱ang Gwaay. The Haida Hereditary Leaders have moral authority over the village sites and are consulted; solutions are based on advice provided by the Haida Hereditary Leaders. The Haida Gwaii Watchmen Program of site guardians and guides is managed by the Skidegate Band Council and is an essential part of the management structure.

Special attention will be given over the long term to monitoring and taking appropriate actions related to a number of factors in and near the property. Specifically, these include the following: potential impacts of climate change; potential building development; marine pollution; local conditions affecting physical fabric including wind, humidity, and temperature; impacts of tourism, visitation and recreational activities; deliberate destruction of heritage; effects of climate change and severe weather; possible sudden ecological and geological events; and invasive species.

Media

Links

http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/157

Haida Nation and Government of Canada Announce Infrastructure Investments in Gwaii Haanas

GWAII HAANAS, BC, July 7, 2016 /CNW/ – Canada’s national parks, marine conservation areas and historic sites represent the very best that Canada has to offer, and support Canada’s tourism industry and local economies. Protecting the land and ocean for present and future generations to visit, and for the Haida National to continue age-old cultural practices. Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site is a shining example of a national heritage place that recognizes the role of Indigenous People in Canada and the traditional use of these special places while the Haida Nation can continue age-old cultural practices.

Today, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna and Council of the Haida Nation, President Peter Lantin, announced infrastructure investments in Gwaii Haanas of over $650,000.

These investments will support projects that directly benefit Haida use of the area, along with new visitor experiences. For example, two pools will be built to capture new locations of thermal water flow and offer visitors the opportunity to experience the popular hotsprings that were lost when the 2012 earthquake struck Haida Gwaii.
Additionally, upgrades to the boardwalk at SGang Gwaay Llnagaay will allow the Haida Gwaii Watchmen and visitors to safely access the site while protecting these culturally and ecologically sensitive areas. These upgrades will also make the site more accessible to those with mobility needs.

Investments in visitor infrastructure – such as trails, visitor centres and campgrounds – at Parks Canada places across the country will ensure the quality and reliability of visitor facilities, and allow more Canadians to experience the outdoors and learn about our environment and history.

Quotes

“SGang Gwaay holds long memories for the Haida Nation, and the village still tells stories today. The site is world renowned; protected by two governments and recognized as a World Heritage Site by the United Nations. Investing in SGang Gwaii is critical to maintain the integrity of the village site and area and will benefit those who are able visit and experience, in situ, the past and present culture of the Haida Nation.”  – Kil tlaats ‘gaa Peter Lantin, President of the Haida Nation

“Parks Canada places belong to all Canadians and tell stories of who we are, including the history, cultures, and contributions of Indigenous peoples. The Government of Canada is proud of its relationship with the Haida Nation at Gwaii Haanas and our shared commitment to conserving, restoring, and presenting this natural and cultural treasure. These investments will ensure high-quality visitor experiences for years to come, while also supporting tourism, local jobs and the regional economy.”
The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada

Quick Facts

• Gwaii Haanas is a premier example of cooperative management of a Canadian protected area. The Archipelago Management Board – comprised of Haida Nation and Government of Canada representatives – manages Gwaii Haanas from mountain top to sea floor using consensus-based decision making.
• Located in the southern part of Haida Gwaii, approximately 130 km off the British Columbia coast and 640 km north of Vancouver, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site encompasses more than 5,000 km2 from mountaintop to seafloor. Gwaii Haanas is renowned for its spectacular wilderness and its vibrant cultural resources as well as for the intimate connections between land, sea and people.
• As a UNESCO World Heritage Site, SGang Gwaay is a stunning example of west coast art and architecture because it contains the largest number of standing memorial and mortuary poles of any village found on the west coast of North America.
• Parks Canada is investing an unprecedented $3 billion dollars over five years to support infrastructure work to heritage, visitor, waterway and highway assets located within national historic sites, national parks, and national marine conservation areas across Canada. These investments represent the largest federal infrastructure plan in the history of Parks Canada.

Related Products

Backgrounder: 2016 Infrastructure Investments

Associated Links

Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site
Council of the Haida Nation
http://www.twitter.com/parkscanada

SOURCE Haida Nation
Image with caption: “Hon. Catherine McKenna, Minister of the Environment and Climate Change, and Minister Responsible for Parks Canada and Kil tlaats ‘gaa Peter Lantin, President of the Haida Nation (CNW Group/Haida Nation)”. Image available at: http://photos.newswire.ca/images/download/20160707_C1871_PHOTO_EN_729350.jpg

For further information: Caitlin Workman, Press Secretary, Office of the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, 819-938-9436; Media Relations, Parks Canada Agency, 855-862-1812, pc.media@pc.gc.ca

http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/cnw/release.html?rkey=20160707C1871&filter=5611